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We invite papers that examine excommunication as a political and social (as well as a religious and theological) act within the European context. In 1521, Pope Leo X formalized Martin Luther's excommunication from the Roman Catholic Church, one of the most politically consequential acts of religious exclusion in European history. In order to interrogate the ongoing relevance of this historical moment, we seek chronologically and geographically diverse proposals that address excommunication as a political and social (as well as a religious and theological) act. Proposed papers might address: the formation and enforcement of community norms and boundaries; negotiations of religious, political, or ethnic identities, whether individual or collective; relationships between religious centers and peripheries; the creation of new religious communities and movements; mechanisms of social and religious discipline; and the wider social implications of religious innovation and dissent. We would also welcome papers that discuss the continuing historical effects of the Protestant Reformation--and the results of this separation of Martin Luther from the Catholic Church--on the shape of Europe.

Co-Chairs:

Lloyd Barba, lbarba@amherst.edu

Trish Beckman, beckman@stolaf.edu

Carol Ferrara, carol_ferrara@emerson.edu

Jonathan Teubner, jonathan.teubner@acu.edu.au